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More Vaccine Information

CHICKENPOX IS CONNECTED TO SHINGLES

Chickenpox is a very contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), and can infect unvaccinated individuals at any age. The virus causes a blister-like rash, itching, tiredness, and fever. 

Two doses of the vaccine are about 90% effective at preventing chickenpox. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends two doses of chickenpox vaccine for children, adolescents, and adults. Children should receive two doses of the vaccine; the first dose at 12 through 15 months old, and a second dose at 4 through 6 years old.

The Mayo Clinic has reported that shingles is caused by the varicella-zoster virus — the same virus that causes chickenpox. After you've had chickenpox, the virus lies inactive in nerve tissue near your spinal cord and brain. Years later, the virus may reactivate as shingles. A shingles vaccine may help prevent shingles.

For informative and accurate information about the chickenpox vaccine, talk with your St. Lawrence Health pediatrician, or visit the CDC's website.

Influenza Vaccine

The message is simple: the influenza vaccine can prevent the flu. The flu is at its peak every year in the United States between October and May, and on average, thousands of people in the Nation will die from it. 

The CDC recommends everyone six months and older get vaccinated every flu season. It takes approximately two weeks for the protection to develop once you have been vaccinated; the vaccine does not cause the flu.

Non-vaccinated individuals who contract this contagious disease may experience fever and chills, sore throat, muscle aches, fatigue, cough, headache, and a runny or stuffy nose. Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

For informative and accurate information about the flu vaccine, talk with your St. Lawrence Health primary care provider, or visit the CDC's website

Rotavirus Vaccine

If symptoms of severe, watery diarrhea and vomiting in your infant or young child are evident, they may have the rotavirus. Children with the virus may become dehydrated and need to be hospitalized. Before this happens, protect them with the rotavirus vaccine. 

The liquid vaccines are given in either three doses or two doses, depending on the vaccine. The first dose is recommended before your infant is 15 weeks old, and all doses should be received before they turn eight months old. 

Rotavirus is transmissible, and there is not currently a medication to treat the infection itself.

For informative and accurate information about the rotavirus vaccine, talk with your St. Lawrence Health pediatrician, or visit the CDC's website